The Summer of Impossible Things by Rowan Coleman



“Have faith in love, and let it guide you, and you never know. Impossible things happen all the time.”

Title: The Summer of Impossible Things
Author: Rowan Coleman
Number of pages: 432 (hardcover edition)
Good things about this book: It’s time travel with lots of feelings.
Bad things about this book: Nothing really.
Do I recommend it? Yes, read it.
Rate: 5/5

Read the summary and add this book on Goodreads: here

Such a magical book, a rollercoaster of emotions. I wanted to like it and instead I loved it. It caught me by surprise and it kept me wondering. It was an incredible story about love, a kind of love that wins it all.

When humans believe in stories extraordinary things happen.

I bought this book last summer when it came out. I loved the cover and the plot intrigued me. It was not entirely different from what I’ve seen in movies in the past but somehow I felt it could be a totally different kind of story altogether, even with some elements in common with what I’ve already experienced. As usual, I bought it, photographed it, and left it there to gather dust and be beautiful in my bookshelf.

Last week, though, I was undecided. I didn’t know what to read and after starting at my bookshelves for centuries, I decided to ask for help. I texted my friend and asked her to pick a colour; she picked yellow. I showed her the yellow section of my bookshelf and she chose this book. This book isn’t yellow, it’s in the orange section but she still saw it in the picture and decided it had a beautiful cover and needed to be read by me. I decided it was fate so I picked it up. Thank you, friend who doesn’t read, for choosing this marvelous book for me.

The most wonderful discoveries that have ever been made by mankind always happen when someone decides to believe in the impossible.

Luna and Pea lost their mother to suicide and they decided to travel to where she was born, in Brooklyn to sell her father’s house and see where she grew up before running away to England with their father, Henry. They received a box with films from their mum telling them that something horrible happened the night she left home, something that scarred her for life, making living unbearable. It’s terrible and frustrating because there’s nothing they can do. Or so they think; Luna, who found Henry is not her real father, can somehow travel back in time to 1977, days before the awful event. Is this a chance to save her mother? Can she fix the past so that the people she loves in the present can be alive and happy without losing herself in the process?

The magical elements of the story, the time travel, the scenes of Luna meeting her mum when she was full of life and with so many dreams, were all what made the story great. It was always interesting, it always kept you wondering what was going to happen, what did happen, how was Luna going to prevent it. Everything made you question her choices because there was so much at stake and we all know how tricky messing with time can be.

All I can do is brace myself against the searing hot pain of only understanding what it means to really want someone at the very moment you know they can never be yours.

Rowan Coleman did it; she took the magic of time travel, of the impossibility of it, and mixed it with love, hope, and hard things in life that make you feel alone in the world. It touched all the right buttons of my heart. I felt anger, frustration, happiness, but above all, I felt hope; because how bad can the world be if there is one person in your life willing to sacrifice themselves for your well-being?

“Our physical bodies, they break down, eventually returning to dust, but energy, energy is never destroyed. And what is love, if it isn’t the most powerful energy we know of?”

I loved how everything unfolded. It was at the right time, with the right amount of twists. At some point I had to turn back in time myself, turning back to previous chapters, because some details I judged of standard importance were instead pretty relevant to the whole narrative. That’s how you do it. That’s how you give me a contemporary story, with magical elements, love, hard topics, a story that takes place in the span of a few days, and make it so believable I can totally see it happening in real life. Recommended to all!



Necropolis by Jordan L. Hawk



“I’d rather perish at your side than – than go home without you. You’re the world to me.”

Title: Necropolis
Author: Jordan L. Hawk
Series: Whyborne & Griffin #4

Number of pages: 202 (paperback edition)
Good things about this book: Ancient Egypt mysteries.
Bad things about this book: Nothing.
Do I recommend it? Yes, if you’re a fan of Whyborne and Griffin then you should read it.
Rate: 5/5

Read the summary and add this book on Goodreads: here

Another day, another adventure for one of my many favourite book couples. I’ve had the 9 books already published for a long time but I’m trying to save them and read them slowly, afraid of having no more Whyborne & Griffin adventures when I need them the most. After a sci-fi book with mysteries from outer space, I knew I was ready for a sane dose of mysteries from ancient Egypt. It has always fascinated me and I have watched The Mummy and the sequel so many times I’ve lost count.

Christine sends a request for help to Whyborne; something is happening in Egypt in one of the excavation sites she’s working at. Grumpily, Whyborne sails for El Cairo, along with a much happier Griffin, to help Christine save her work and maybe also her life. Someone is rising from the dead and doesn’t want to spread love around the world. Our two beloved men will have to confront forces of evil, but also new love and a rather peculiar family reunion in the desolated and unforgiving lands of Pharaohs and sorcerers.

A disheveled and unshaved Whyborne was an image I didn’t think I needed in my life but now that I had it, I know I couldn’t have lived without reading about it. The clear pictures I have in my head of a smelly and dirty Whyborne are things of beauty. He, always so impeccable, now forced to be far from civilization for so long, but loving the mysteries of Christine’s new findings. I think he loved it, with all the sand in uncomfortable places and all. They still had time for steamy intimate moments, so I don’t think there was much to complain about the situation.

“I swear, you men have your entire egos tied to the functioning of a few inches of flesh.”
“More than a few,” Griffin said with a smirk.

Griffin was really careful in this book; after all that happened in the previous one, I think it’s understandable. He doesn’t like Whyborne experimenting with magic because he loves him so much he doesn’t want to lose him like he lost someone he cared about in the past. The nightmares are still very present in his mind and, in this adventure, he will have to summon all his courage and face his worst fears. Besides Whyborne being like a very stubborn baby with a new toy, and all the fights this could generate, this book is a chance for the two men to clear things up, things that are bringing Whyborne down for no reason other than his overthinking brain.

“I’ve always held humans are the stupidest of animals.” Christine cast us a rueful grin, “We’ve no notion when to turn and run screaming.”

Seeing Christine doing what she does best gave her so many more points in my book. She is graceful in her not standard feminine ways; I think her not wanting to conform with what society thinks a woman must or mustn’t do has shaped her making her someone who can do everything and more if you let her try. She will demonstrate she is valuable just as much as any man, and she can do things the same way, if not better, than her fellow male co-workers. I wish the world saw her as the force of nature she truly is. Go get them, Christine!

The fifth book of the series will have to wait because, as much as I love reading about Whyborne and Griffin, I realized I have so many unread books I want to read so much. Time just isn’t enough. Will I have to give up sleep? Nah, I don’t think my body is up to the task, it’s lazy.


Caroline’s Heart by Austin Chant



God, he thinks, he could be starving and she’d fill him up with one sweet look.

Title: Caroline’s Heart
Author: Austin Chant
Number of pages: 96 (kindle edition)
Good things about this book: Magic and lgbtqia representation.
Bad things about this book: I want to say it’s too short but no, it is perfect as it is..
Do I recommend it? Yes, it’s an enchanting story.
Rate: 5/5

Read the summary and add this book on Goodreads: here

Some time ago I happened to see a gorgeous cover of a book called “Peter Darling” and decided to read it. I fell in love with the quality of writing and the originality of how the story of Peter Pan was retold. I decided to keep an eye on Austin Chant because I knew he was going to give me more magical tales full of representation and fantasy themes.

This is a story about Roy, a trans cowboy who finds himself involved in the life of the town’s witch, Cecily, after a fight resulting in him almost losing his life. Cecily has to put inside Roy the mechanical and magical heart of her long lost lover, Caroline, ruining her chances to resuscitate her with a spell she designed. The book is not about Roy finding out he is trans and it’s not about people finding it out and bullying him, beating him or worst, trying to kill him because he’s different. This is a book about the everyday lives of Roy and Cecily forced to live together until Roy heals completely and adjusts to the new heart. It’s sweet, emotional, and of course, magical.

It wasn’t only magical because of Cecily being a witch but mainly because the writing style of Austin Chant is enchanting. One second you’re trying your best not to freeze to death on your couch, then the next second you’re fully immerse in the story you don’t realize you barely feel your nose and fingers. I felt warm and good inside with every page I read. It’s a novella so it’s short, worth every second you spend reading it. Cecily and Roy are two wonderful characters and, even though Roy doesn’t have magic powers, he is plenty magical himself with his kind nature, sincerity and his optimistic personality. It’s easy to feel for them and want them to be happy and serene.

If you have a couple hours or less to spare, then I recommend you read this novella. Who wouldn’t want to have magic powers to conjure food and clean the house? I know I would. I’m in a lasagna mood right now.


They Mostly Come Out At Night by Benedict Patrick



Title: They Mostly Come Out At Night
Author: Benedict Patrick
Series: Yarnsworld #1
Number of pages: 200 (paperback edition)
Good things about this book: The twists left me speechless. Also the cover is gorgeous!
Bad things about this book: The first half is maybe a little bit slow but it doesn’t take long for it to change.
Do I recommend it? Yes, and also the other books of Yarnsworld even if I haven’t read them yet.
Rate: 4/5

Read the summary and add this book on Goodreads: here

This book really surprised me. At first I got often angry, then I was certain some things were going to have the obvious outcome, then they didn’t and I enjoyed the second half of the book a lot more and got into the story with a newly found awe. Long story short, I couldn’t put it down; luckily it is a short book.

We have two parallel stories: on one side there is Lonan, the outcast of a little village, hated by everyone because of a misunderstanding. On the other side there is Adahy, the Magpie prince, then King of the corvae people, who has the duty to protect the villagers from the monsters that come out at night. How does their separate story come together? Lonan dreams of the magpie prince, he sees through his eyes; everything that Adahy sees, Lonan sees.

Lonan knows of new dangers but can’t tell anyone without looking like someone who has lost their mind. He is already hated and seen with disgust by the one he loves so he doesn’t want to add this new peculiarity to the already messy mix.

Everyone in the various villages of corvae has a Knack, an ability, a talent, in something that makes them useful to the growing of the community. Lonan’s father was a blacksmith so he thought that was going to be his Knack but after that horrible night when the monsters took his father’s life, Lonan was outcasted and he didn’t develop any Knack of his own. Being Knackless is like being useless. A village doesn’t need a useless inhabitant.

Through Lonan we see Adahy’s life and struggles and in his waking hours, we see Lonan’s struggles and pain. He is tormented by the images he sees every night and he is conflicted because sharing this information will probably save people’s life but it’s also possible it will make them hate him even more. What is the right thing to do? What can he do to help the Magpie King save their land from the monsters that mostly come out at night?

This is a very short book but it has a lot of twists you wouldn’t expect. The characters are rich and if you need to hate someone, the hate you feel is strong. Feelings are overall very strong throughout the story: anger, frustration, sadness, hopelessness, hopefulness, and also happiness. So many things can change the course of the story but sacrifices have to be made for the ones you love to survive.

Will Lonan find a way to save his village? Will Adahy overcome his fears and save his land? So many things will happen for you to find out the answers to these questions. Trust me, though, you probably won’t guess the outcome.


Stormhaven by Jordan L. Hawk


“I wasn’t strong, or brave, or anything really. But he made me want to be.”

Title: Stormhaven
Author: Jordan L. Hawk
Series: Whyborne & Griffin #3
Number of pages: 177 (paperback)
Good things about this book: More love and more magic, what’s not to love?
Bad things about this book: Too short? But maybe not.
Do I recommend it? Yes, it is very short and the story is more and more interesting.
Rate: 5/5

Read the summary and add this book on Goodreads: here

Whyborne can’t catch a break. Now he has one more reason to scowl: electricity. Why is it so weird for a guy to want a poor lit house with a library with books to read almost in the dark causing permanent damage to his eyes? Whyborne can’t understand progress but he can understand magic: he’s a better sorcerer now and every book has a new spell he will use to fight and win whatever will come between him and Griffin.

Not only electricity has come to put a bad taste into Whyborne’s mouth, but a case involving a coworker accused of murder will put the two men in an unstable state: the suspect resides now in an asylum which is bad news to Griffin. I’m furious after learning what happened to him, unfairly and unnecessarily just because people are disgusting and completely selfish. Poor Griffin: his nightmares keep him up at night but he has Whyborne who will be by his side no matter what.

You’d think there’s nothing worse than the devilish electricity, the asylum, the mysterious cult worshipping a sea monster, and the possible end of the world, right? What about Griffin’s parents coming to visit with a surprise and the two of them have to pretend they are merely friends? It is worse because it will put Whyborne back into his pessimistic habits. His mind will weaken and weird thoughts will crawl in there. There’s nothing worse than a weak mind when there’s the menace of the evil rising!

“I wish to be with you until the breath leaves my body, until the last stars burn out, and the earth falls into the dying sun.”

There was so much love in this book besides the main evil plot: that’s a mystery you have to read or else it will spoil the fun. Griffin and Whyborne has come to a turning point in their relationship and maybe things are going to get better or they may easily get worse. Whyborne loves Griffin so much he doesn’t want him to suffer even if avoiding the pain will put him into a pit of despair. He’d sacrifice his own happiness to see the man he loves be his very best. I was heartbroken at Whyborne’s thoughts because he wasn’t being selfish; he was being realistic in a world that considers him a criminal only because he loves a man. Living hidden from society is taking its toll on them but love wins, right? I sure hope it’ll be the case until the very last book.

“You’re really choosing him over your family?”
“Whyborne is my family.”

I love how short these books are and how fast I can read them without putting them down. I have to pace myself, though. I don’t want to get to the last one published and have to wait who the hell knows how long for the next one. I can be very patient, but sometimes I’m not.


The Druid Next Door by E.J. Russell



Never underestimate the power of kindness.

Title: The Druid Next Door
Author: E.J. Russell
Series: Fae Out of Water #2
Number of pages: 328 (kindle edition)
Good things about this book: I loved the welsh references even if I don’t think I could pronounce any of the words and I loved hearing in my head the way Mal spoke.
Bad things about this book: It has its flaws but nothing that spoils the book.
Do I recommend it? Yes, I do.
Rate: 4/5

Read the summary and add this book on Goodreads: here

You know how much I like stories about magic and mythical creatures so there was no way I wasn’t going to like this book. I enjoyed a lot the first one in this series and I was very glad to see the main characters appear and have a significant role in the events occurring here. David is adorable and I’m happy he is embracing his nature and his powers: he helps the boys a lot and when he talked about Alun there was so much love in every single word and it made me very happy.

“I only eat phallic food in front of Alun. Otherwise, it’s just a wasted opportunity.”

This book’s main character is Alun’s brother, Mal Kendrick, and an ovo-pescatarian environmental professor, Bryce MacLeod, who is Mal’s neighbor in the new super energy friendly house David bought him. Saving Alun’s life has cost Mal the use of his sword hand, the right, and has gained him the exile from Faerie, a curse he doesn’t know how to break and a severe case of brooding. Oh boy, does he brood. He broods with intensity, with passion. Lord Broody Kendrick.

Mal and Bryce meet in circumstances that make Mal thinks Bryce is an annoying but hot tree hugger, and makes Bryce think Mal is only a pretty face (read: the hottest face he’s ever seen with the body of a marble statue) with a terrible attitude. Little they know they will be forced to join forces to save the world. Yes, the world, I’m not exaggerating, the world is in danger.

Bryce is a druid but didn’t know he was one until Mal came into his life turning it upside down. He is powerful and needs a tutor and Cassie, David’s druid aunt, puts a leash on Mal and Bryce, a magical leash that doesn’t allow them to separate, to force Mal to teach the new druid everything there is to know about the supernatural world. There’s so much to know and Bryce is not once scared; he is interested and he thinks his newly found talents to be the greatest thing that’s ever happened to him. That and Mal, of course.

“If I’m all that bloody, maybe you should call me Macbeth.”

The attraction between the two of them is almost immediate. Mal is gorgeous and, even if Bryce doesn’t think much of himself, Mal thinks he is just beautiful even with his terrible fashion sense and his tactical vests and pants. If you are attractive to a sex god even in tactical clothes, you are not allowed to feel unworthy of his attention. Mal pretty much falls at Bryce’s feet, but that’s something you need to read about to fully understand.

You were almost feeling up a druid—reason has clearly abandoned ship already.

Mal is being offered a chance to break the curse by a giant cloaked figure and he accepts without asking details because he was drunk. Now he has to lie and ask Bryce to join forces to complete a series of tasks that will unveil secrets that will change the Faerie world and will put them in serious danger. In addition to all of that they are also trying to understand if the magical attraction for each other is real or just another one of the druid magic catches. After all, Mal feels the need to submit and that’s something that’s never happened in all the years he’s being alive. Things are going to get hot hot hot. HOT HOT HOT!

Mal and Bryce were great together, steamy, but sometimes they were very insufferable for two grown men; you can’t expect someone to act like you’d do and then if that doesn’t happen being mad. Still I found their story intriguing and entertaining. Now I can’t wait for the last book that comes out in less than a month and find out everything about Gareth.


The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender by Leslye Walton



“Love makes us such fools.”

Title: The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender
Author: Leslye Walton
Good things about this book: It is magical and so well-written.
Bad things about this book: Nothing.
Do I recommend it? Yes!
Rate: 5/5

Read the summary and add this book on Goodreads: here

Perfect narration, lovely characters, a wonderful story told by an exceptional person. Felt like being in a world that was a mix of Amélie Poulain and Pushing Daisies. This book felt like all the colours, the brightest ones. It was enchanting and magical. I loved it all; I also loved how mad certain passages made me feel, at the way the scenes narrated made me navigate through my emotions. It was the perfect book, of the perfect length, for perfect summer afternoons. I read it slowly enjoying every bit of it.

The whole book is told by Ava Lavender: an exceptional girl born with a pair of extraordinary wings. Ava and her twin brother, Henry, are two peculiar children, each of them with something that make them stand up to the world, that make people see them as different. Ava with her wings and Henry with his silence and amazing map drawing skills.

The story, as much as it is about Ava, it is more about her family: her grandmother and mother’s adventures mainly. Ava recounts the story of her great-grandparents when they decided to move, with their four children, from a little town in France to Manhattan. It is a sad story about misunderstandings, love, lost love, pain and death. It seems that nothing goes right to the women of their family when it comes to love.

She worried she couldn’t protect me from all the things that had hurt her: loss and fear, pain and love.
Most especially from love.

I really loved how things were told, the feeling you got of the surroundings really brought out all the magical realism of the story. How the natural elements were mixed up with magic, without being weird or exaggerated, was done perfectly. There’s so much magic in this book and it fits it like a glove. I wish I lived in Ava’s world with ghosts, wings, baked goods that could change your mood, a weird house and its marvelous inhabitants. They brought me joy and I read about theirs lives feeling like a friend.

She learned how to worry. She, who’d always thought love’s only companion was sorrow, learned that worry came hand in hand with love.

Ava Lavender is just a girl. Her mother, Vivian, is just a heartbroken woman. Her grandmother, Emilienne, is just a baker. They are “just” something until you stop looking at the surface without seeing how many layers of magic, kindness and strength there is inside each one of these women. They are the powerhouses of this book. They are what make you turn the pages anxious to know more, to see them get the ending they truly deserve.

I recommend this if you’re looking for a magical book but as much as it is a light and easy read, check the trigger warnings and if knowing everything you still want to give it go, then you have my full approval!