Dangerous Spirits by Jordan L. Hawk

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4stars

Title: Dangerous Spirits
Author: Jordan L. Hawk
Series: Spirits #2
Number of pages: 184 (paperback edition)
Good things about this book: Henry and Vincent and really sweet together.
Bad things about this book: I hate miscommunication and this book have it.
Do I recommend it? If you love Hawk’s books then you don’t want to miss this series!
Rate: 4/5

Read the summary and add this book on Goodreads: here

I love ghost stories and this one was great. Little drama and lot of sweetness. The vengeful spirit was scary as hell and I didn’t want the characters to be hurt by it. But there was so much more to the story than the one on the surface, and I love how many details were put into just a few pages.

New characters were introduced and I knew they were going to bring chaos to the romantic relationship of our main characters. One character in particular I hated from the start. Speaking poisonous words of my Henry, he who is only at fault of having low self-esteem.

I don’t like miscommunication. No, I hate it. There are so many things that could be avoided if people just told the truth instead of concealing it. You don’t things aren’t going to end well if someone is hiding something. It’s a situation doomed from the start.

Besides the dreaded miscommunication, the story was full of the things that made me like this series: ghosts, nice characters, twists, and new questions to be answered in the third and last book. I can’t wait to find out more!

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Wonders of the Invisible World by Christopher Barzak

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5stars

“Everything about us was entirely normal, really. We were as ordinary as anything we might come across in this world.”

Title: Wonders of the Invisible World
Author: Christopher Barzak
Number of pages: 352 (paperback edition)
Good things about this book: It’s written in a very magical way. I loved everything about it.
Bad things about this book: I feel that this is a kind of narration that can be hard to get into.
Do I recommend it? Yes, I’ll give it a chance if I were you.
Rate: 5/5

Read the summary and add this book on Goodreads: here

As I thought from the blurb and from the first chapters, I really liked this book and how the story unfolded, circled back, flashed forward, backwards or whatever. It has that touch of magical realism, spells, curses, a world beyond the world, harbingers of death, mysteries, everything that I love. Peculiar and magical with a love story as sweet as honey, the perfect combo!

It was pretty weird and sometimes it could be hard to follow with all the dreams sequences and memories, but I found it fascinating, so I focused really hard and enjoyed the ride. Aidan is such a sweet boy, trying his best to remember what’s been forgotten, while experiencing feelings he thinks he is supposed to find wrong but instead come to him as easily as breathing and seeing the invisible world.

“Here they were, the people we were becoming, about to knock on our front door, hoping they could undo the mistakes we were making at that very moment.”

Jarrod is one hell of a supporting character; he supports Aidan in all his crazy life with such sincerity and love, just because he cares and wants to be with this sweet boy who sees what other people can’t. Aidan’s mother was a bit of a pain in the butt with all her evasiveness and half sentences, but Jarrod comes to the rescue every single time, and he stole, not only Aidan’s heart, but also mine.

I get sad when I see a low rating of a book I’ve loved, but I understand where they come from; this is the kind of book that you love or don’t understand its meaning or purpose. It’s weird and full of details many may find boring and unnecessary. But if you come to understand it, you’ll see how truly marvelous and magical this story is and you’ll love it. That’s what happened to me, and I hope it happens to many other readers who’ll decide to give this book a chance.

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The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman

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5stars

“Of all organs,” said Nehemiah Trot, “the tongue is the most remarkable. For we use it both to taste our sweet wine and bitter poison, thus also do we utter words both sweet and sour with same tongue.”

Title: The Graveyard Book
Author: Neil Gaiman
Number of pages: 327 (paperback edition)
Good things about this book: It’s magical.
Bad things about this book: The mystery that wasn’t really explained.
Do I recommend it? Yes, of course.
Rate: 5/5

Read the summary and add this book on Goodreads: here

A couple years ago I bought the audiobook and started listening to it but as it always happens to me with books I haven’t read before listening to them, I got distracted and kept losing parts of the narration. I loved listening to Neil Gaiman tell the story but his voice wasn’t enough to get me focus on the book. I gave up until I decided to buy the physical book and now I could read a story that really deserved all my attention.

Nobody Owens is quite an interesting boy; we read about him growing up in the graveyard after a mysterious man called Jack murders his parents and sister. As a toddler he was inquisitive and curious. As a pre-teen he was obnoxious and unnecessarily rebellious. As a teenager he made questionable decisions but was overall a nice kid. I came to like him and I cheered for him to have a happy life surrounded by people who cared for him. It was going to be hard and I knew that.

“You’re always you, and that don’t change, and you’re always changing, and there’s nothing you can do about it.”

I forgot about the mystery about Bod and why Jack wanted him dead after that first part and every time someone mentioned it I asked myself why it was so important to kill Bod. Why was Bod’s dead essential? I was curious. A lot, but then, in my opinion, the reason was not explained and the ending left me with too many questions. More than I’m used to have after finishing a book without sequels. That’s the only bad thing (if we can call it bad) about his book. The rest was exquisite and it gave me a newly found trust about Gaiman’s books with younger protagonists. I had a bad experience but I wasn’t going to let that ruin this marvellous author for me!

“You’re alive, Bod. That means you have infinite potential. You can do anything, make anything, dream anything. If you can change the world, the world will change. Potential. Once you’re dead, it’s gone. Over. You’ve made what you’ve made, dreamed your dream, written your name. You may be buried here, you may even walk. But that potential is finished.”

Now I have a couple Gaiman’s books on my bookshelves that require my attention and I need to finish reading his comic book Sandman that I’m reading so slowly I’ve been in stand-by mode for months. I can do it!

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Stormhaven by Jordan L. Hawk

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“I wasn’t strong, or brave, or anything really. But he made me want to be.”

Title: Stormhaven
Author: Jordan L. Hawk
Series: Whyborne & Griffin #3
Number of pages: 177 (paperback)
Good things about this book: More love and more magic, what’s not to love?
Bad things about this book: Too short? But maybe not.
Do I recommend it? Yes, it is very short and the story is more and more interesting.
Rate: 5/5

Read the summary and add this book on Goodreads: here

Whyborne can’t catch a break. Now he has one more reason to scowl: electricity. Why is it so weird for a guy to want a poor lit house with a library with books to read almost in the dark causing permanent damage to his eyes? Whyborne can’t understand progress but he can understand magic: he’s a better sorcerer now and every book has a new spell he will use to fight and win whatever will come between him and Griffin.

Not only electricity has come to put a bad taste into Whyborne’s mouth, but a case involving a coworker accused of murder will put the two men in an unstable state: the suspect resides now in an asylum which is bad news to Griffin. I’m furious after learning what happened to him, unfairly and unnecessarily just because people are disgusting and completely selfish. Poor Griffin: his nightmares keep him up at night but he has Whyborne who will be by his side no matter what.

You’d think there’s nothing worse than the devilish electricity, the asylum, the mysterious cult worshipping a sea monster, and the possible end of the world, right? What about Griffin’s parents coming to visit with a surprise and the two of them have to pretend they are merely friends? It is worse because it will put Whyborne back into his pessimistic habits. His mind will weaken and weird thoughts will crawl in there. There’s nothing worse than a weak mind when there’s the menace of the evil rising!

“I wish to be with you until the breath leaves my body, until the last stars burn out, and the earth falls into the dying sun.”

There was so much love in this book besides the main evil plot: that’s a mystery you have to read or else it will spoil the fun. Griffin and Whyborne has come to a turning point in their relationship and maybe things are going to get better or they may easily get worse. Whyborne loves Griffin so much he doesn’t want him to suffer even if avoiding the pain will put him into a pit of despair. He’d sacrifice his own happiness to see the man he loves be his very best. I was heartbroken at Whyborne’s thoughts because he wasn’t being selfish; he was being realistic in a world that considers him a criminal only because he loves a man. Living hidden from society is taking its toll on them but love wins, right? I sure hope it’ll be the case until the very last book.

“You’re really choosing him over your family?”
“Whyborne is my family.”

I love how short these books are and how fast I can read them without putting them down. I have to pace myself, though. I don’t want to get to the last one published and have to wait who the hell knows how long for the next one. I can be very patient, but sometimes I’m not.

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Rag and Bone by K.J. Charles

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4stars

Title: Rag and Bone
Author: K.J. Charles
Good things about this book: Magic and mystery and Stephen Day!
Bad things about this book: Nothing.
Do I recommend it? Yes, but read the prequel first!
Rate: 4/5

Read the summary and add this book on Goodreads: here

Magic. I just love magic. I fell in love with the world K.J. Charles built in the Charm of Magpies series; loved the characters, magical ones and not. I think I need to read again the whole series. I’m in need of Stephen and Crane! Honestly, I could read thousands of books set in that magnificent magical Victorian England.

Rag and Bone has been in my kindle library for months, untouched, unread, with no logical reason whatsoever. If you want to read it, I recommend you read first the small prequel that is like a long prologue for the story. I think without reading A Queer Trade you’re missing a lot of the story; it tells how our two main characters meet and what the hell is going on at the beginning of this book. I really think that without reading the prequel there’s too many things that not make much sense. The prequel is a must read.

Crispin and Ned meet under weird circumstances and they find themselves involved in even weirder events. Thanks to this misadventure, they seem to be in a stable relationship now, with its ups and down of course. So, pretty normal. But Crispin isn’t a normal human being, he has magic and, after spending so many years using it in illegal ways, now he’s finding it so hard fitting in the practitioners’ world. Ned used bone and blood magic that it’s illegal and only warlocks use it. And if you’re a warlock, it means you’re evil: but our Crispin may be insecure, a little judgey, a bit self-centred, and naïve, but he certainly isn’t evil.

Ned, on the other hand, is no magician: he is a waste-man and he is good at what he does. He has a hearing talent, though: he can hear magic but can’t use it. This hearing talent is a main resource to solving this book’s mystery case but not without Ned wanting to punch every single practitioner on Earth. Ned doesn’t like magic, he doesn’t trust it. He sees how magic influences Crispin, how bad it can be and how practitioners think only magical people deserve help, forgetting how non-magic folks are somehow innocent victims of their wrongdoings.

Crispin and Ned are very good for each other but they have issues they need to get through to be able to be 100% happy. I got mad at Crispin, I really did, he was making bad choices because he didn’t see how much value he had as a person; he was always seeing how he was not enough and that was self-destructive. I cheered for him and his happiness. I wanted him to be able to use his magic legally and easily. I wanted him to be proud of himself. I wanted people to see how worthy of a second chance he was, just the way Ned saw him. Ned thought Crispin amazing, and he was afraid of always being second place to magic. Those two were going to have a tortuous road to happiness but it was going to be worth it.

Do you want to know what I loved about this book and its prequel/prologue? I loved the importance that was given to kisses. I have always thought kisses to be the best romantic gesture of all, the most intimate. You give me a couple that kisses with such love and passion, and you have in me their number 1 fan.

I pray to our Lord Crane to have more stories set in this magical world! Lord Crane, do this for me, please! Just this once!

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Spectred Isle by K.J. Charles

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5stars

“People create poetry and mustard gas. We invent gods and monsters and gods that might as well be monsters. We act with extraordinary grace and unfathomable cruelty. We’re so terribly intelligent, and dreadfully easy to fool.”

Title: Spectred Isle (Green Men #1)
Author: K.J. Charles
Good things about this book: Paranormal and wonderful romance written perfectly.
Bad things about this book: Nothing.
Do I recommend it? Yes!
Rate: 5/5

Read the summary and add this book on Goodreads: here

If there’s something I like to read more than books with happy endings, are fantasy books with happy endings. Spectred Isle has that and I loved all of it: mystery, ghosts, spirits, magic, great characters, and great chemistry between said characters. I can reconfirm that K.J. Charles can and will steal my heart with every book she writes. The story flows flawlessly with the need to know more about everything, the need to know these characters you’ve loved, possibly from page 1, are going to be happy and okay in the end.

Saul, an archaeologist dishonourably discharged from the war, is now working for the only man that doesn’t mind what he did in the past. This man is a paranormal fanatic and is looking for everything out of the ordinary in London and surroundings. Saul helps him going to the places he points out to see if he sees something strange that can’t be explained. Saul doesn’t believe in the paranormal but he needs money so he refrains himself from criticizing his boss’ hobby. I would love going to a ghost/treasure hunt but maybe I’m not that brave, or for that matter, that adventurous.

“You were a pawn in a damned complex game, and you were played and sacrificed as such. I’m glad you weren’t taken off the board altogether.”

During a weird episode of a tree catching fire without apparent reason, Saul stumbles upon Randolph, the last occultist of the Glyde family. After that peculiar event, Saul runs into Randolph everywhere he goes. Saul wonders why he is always meeting this fascinating and handsome man in the weirdest places. Randolph wonders why this seemingly normal man is always involved in strange paranormal events. Something is happening, the veil that separates the worlds is thinner every day, things are looking bad. To answer Randolph perplexities comes a vague prophecy and maybe it can explain why Saul is always where he isn’t supposed to be.

Saul realised, the painful prospect of hoping again was better than the dull knowledge he never would.

The prophecy may explain why they run into each other more often than not, but it doesn’t explain the feelings they are both experiencing. Feelings they are both afraid of but are hoping for them to be reciprocated. Saul and Randolph have great chemistry; from the very first time they meet they can’t get the other out their minds. They have both had difficult love lives or none at all, only casual encounters in a world that sees their sexuality as a crime. I love that they are straightforward; they don’t leave things to unnecessary misunderstandings. They say what they have to say, what they hope: they open themselves, exposing vulnerability because what they may have seems worth it.

“I have a sinking feeling, based on no prior experience whatsoever, that I love you.”

Randolph is a wonderful character and I loved him from the beginning. You notice him changing because of Saul, talking more about what he wants and what he feels, being sassy and clever, and fighting for what he treasures. The book has a little bit of an open ending because there’s going to be more than one book, so I hope there’s going to be more of Randolph and Saul in the future.

“My shoulders ache in wet weather. Unfortunately, I live in England.”

I was left happy and wanting more. There’s nothing better than that to confirm how much you enjoyed a book, right?

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